Hello

skunkbear:

NASA engineers use origami as inspiration when they fold up solar panels for their trip to space. Shown here: the Miura fold. Once a piece of paper (or solar array) is all folded up, it can be completely unfolded in one smooth motion. You can read more about origami in space here, and learn how to do the Miura fold in this video:

Image: Astronaut Scott Parazynski repairs a damaged ISS solar panel (NASA)

razorshapes:

Richard Mosse - The Enclave (2012)

From HUH. Magazine:

"…shot using discontinued military surveillance film formerly used to identify camouflaged targets.

Mosse and his team spent three years in eastern Congo to shoot the unsettling series, which documents a brutal conflict that, to date, has killed 5.4 million people.”

punkmarauder:

can you imagine Oliver having to show up at quidditch trials and say ‘anyone who’s here to try out for seeker better go back up to the castle because an 11 year old boy rode a broom for the first time today and McGonagall gave him the seeker position before asking me or letting me see him play sorry guys’

malformalady:

Bioluminescent effects from the algae at Torrey Pines State Beach. Bioluminescent dinoflagellates are algae that produce bright blue light when stimulated by movement. Their populations are distributed depending on temperature, salinity, or depth.An algal bloom of dinoflagellates can result in a visible coloration of the water colloquially known as red tide. At night, water can have an appearance of sparkling light due to the bioluminescence of dinoflagellates. More than 18 genera of dinoflagellates are bioluminescent, and the majority of them emit a blue-green light.
Photo credit: Kyle Covey

malformalady:

Bioluminescent effects from the algae at Torrey Pines State Beach. Bioluminescent dinoflagellates are algae that produce bright blue light when stimulated by movement. Their populations are distributed depending on temperature, salinity, or depth.An algal bloom of dinoflagellates can result in a visible coloration of the water colloquially known as red tide. At night, water can have an appearance of sparkling light due to the bioluminescence of dinoflagellates. More than 18 genera of dinoflagellates are bioluminescent, and the majority of them emit a blue-green light.

Photo credit: Kyle Covey